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White Chair, Hander Woodworking
This chair was ordered through a designer in California and it was finished by a local California company.  It was shipped to the customer in Washington state and he picked it up in Seattle.   He said they paid a king's ransom for it and after six months of waiting his wife was very anxious to receive it. The chair and customer made the 30 mile journey back to Auburn uneventfully until they took the exit off of Highway 18, in Auburn.  At that point the chair flew out of the truck bed and skidded down the road on its back, passing the mortified owner in the process.  The owner chased the chair down and took it straight to Schoenfeld Furniture, who directed him to Hander Woodworking.  It is fair to say he was sweating bullets when he arrived at their shop.

The chair was made of beech wood and approximately 3/4 of an inch of wood was ground off of the back part of the back legs at  30 degree angles leaving the front bottom surface of the legs looking like stakes one pounds into the ground.  The upper back surface of the top was ground down approximately 3/8 of an inch and multiple 1/4 inch deep gouges peppered the back of the chair.  In order to replace the damaged pieces with new, the chair needed to come apart but its integrity remained exceptionally strong.  That was amazing in itself, but the truly remarkable thing was not a speck of dirt got on the white fabric.  It was as fresh as the day it left the upholsterer's.  That miracle created a bit of a dilemma, though.  Had the fabric needed replacing, it would have been stripped off and replaced, though at a much greater cost.  But to replace the top piece meant pulling the fabric off and trying to reattach stretched upholstery.  That is rarely a good idea if one is looking for a professional appearance and with the daunting task of pulling hundreds of staples without damaging or soiling the fabric, and being that it was a brand new chair it was decided to repair the missing wood rather than replacing the damaged pieces.  This meant filling the gouges with polyester filler.  Unfortunately, the gouges were so wide and numerous simple touch up would not suffice.  Faux graining needed to be painted.  The various pictures show the progression of the painting.  The first step was the ground color, which covered all of the fill, and then the graining proceeded on top of the ground, to its completion.

When the customer returned to pick up the chair he was so stunned that for awhile he adamantly refused to believe it was the same chair he brought in.  It took serious and extensive convincing before he would believe it was not a different chair or that Hander Woodworking had not rebuilt it.    After finally believing Mr. Hander, he then expressed how much they had saved his "skin" and he gave them a tip.  Ah, they do love happy clients.
    

Ground color and first phase of graining.
Second phase of graining: adding ray cells characteristic of beech.
Third phase:  color toning.
Graining complete, ready for final color and sheen.
White Chair, Hander Woodworking
White Chair, Hander Woodworking
White Chair, Hander Woodworking
White Chair, Hander Woodworking